Tag Archives: open-source

Very Sleepy CS is now Very Sleepy

I am delighted to announce that my fork of the Very Sleepy profiler, Very Sleepy CS, has been blessed as the official repository by Richard Mitton (Very Sleepy maintainer). As such, the Very Sleepy homepage has been updated to point to the GitHub repository and list the forked releases since Richard’s last release. You can also read Richard’s announcement on his blog.

I have already reverted the name change in the source code, though the currently-newest release (v0.90) is still labeled with the old name. The next release will call itself Very Sleepy again.


ae.utils.funopt is a std.getopt enhancer:

import std.stdio, ae.utils.funopt;

int run(bool verbose, string input, string output)
	// ...
	return 0;

int main(string[] args)
		return funopt!run(args);
	catch (Exception e)
		stderr.writeln("Error: ", e.msg);
		return 1;

Running program --verbose input.txt output.txt will cause run to be called with the appropriate arguments. Continue reading

Splicing git repositories

Some projects eventually get split up into multiple source repositories for whatever reason. Sometimes, it is useful however to present the project as a single repository – it’s more difficult to examine a project’s development history when it is scattered among several repositories. Specifically, git bisect will not be very helpful if there is strong inter-dependency between the repositories, such as with the reference D programming language implementation. Or you may just not like the layout, which pushes you into using a complicated build process you may not want to use, which was the case for me with the new DerelictOrg repositories. Continue reading

Functional image processing in D

I’ve recently completed an overhaul of the graphics package of my D library. The goals for the overhaul were inspired by D’s std.algorithm and std.range modules:

  • Present everything as small, composable components
  • Avoid implicit copying and prefer lazy evaluation
  • Use templates for efficient code

From its first iteration, all components of the image processing package were templated by the color type. This is not a conventional way to implement graphics libraries – most libraries abstract away the exact color type the image uses behind an OOP interface, or they simply convert all images to a single in-memory pixel format. However, for most cases, this is wasteful and inefficient – usually, the programmer already knows the exact format that an image will be in, with notable exceptions being applications in which the image data comes from user input (e.g. image editors). Instead, this library declares all image types as templates, with the type indicating the image’s color being a template parameter.

I’m rather pleased with the result of this overhaul, so I’d like to share some highlights in this article. Continue reading

Very Sleepy fork

I got fed up with waiting/pestering Richard Mitton (aka Kayamon / @grumpygiant) to integrate the Very Sleepy patches I’ve sent him last year or putting the code on a software forge, so I’m publishing my patches on GitHub myself.

Very Sleepy is a polling Windows profiler with a wxWidgets-based GUI. This is a fork of the latest released version at the time of writing (0.82).

There have been a few more forks of Very Sleepy (e.g. here and here), but these are based off older versions. It’s possible that their changes had already been merged into the official version.

Update: I’ve continued development of my fork, at the above-mentioned location. Check the GitHub project for the changelog, downloads, and more information.

Update 2: Very Sleepy CS is now Very Sleepy!

DHCP test client

While trying to set up my home network, I was dismayed that there was no simple way to test the DHCP server. Snooping packets is limited to examining existing traffic.

DHCP test tools exist (DHCPing and dhquery), however both are outdated and don’t work with the latest versions of their requirements, and both won’t work on Windows.

I’ve written a simple DHCP “client” which can receive and decode broadcasted DHCP replies, as well as send out DHCP “discover” packets. The tool is cross-platform, and should work on Windows and major POSIX systems.

Source, Windows binaries.

64-bit CacheSet

SysInternals CacheSet has a limitation: it is unable to set a cache size larger than 4GB. This is due to the fact that it is a 32-bit application, and the respective API (NtSetSystemInformation) accepts new settings as a 32-bit byte count.

The solution: use the 64-bit API, which uses 64-bit integers. I’ve written a very simple 64-bit CacheSet-alike – just enter the desired cache size (in bytes). You can use the original CacheSet to check the new settings (just don’t hit “Apply”, or your settings might get clobbered).

Source, download.